Appendices

Appendix 1: Main study data collection schedules.

Appendix 2: British Journal of Educational Technology Paper, ‘Visual Elements and container metaphors for multi-media’.

Appendix 3: List of papers and presentations during the research period.

Appendix 4: Starcatcher programme 1 of the series, (cassette tape) pupil’s booklet and teacher’s notes. (See attached in separate folder.)

Appendix 5: The CD-ROM of the Research Tool (Mac version). (See attached.)

Appendix 6: Field Work Diary Part 2: Titles of the PowerPoint reports for BBC Education Directorate

(See in file Fieldworkdiary2.doc on accompanying CD-ROM for PowerPoint presentations)

Appendix 1:

Main study data collection schedules: showing school name, date and time, the focus of areas of interest and the seating plan of the children used to log names.

Children’s interview schedule: showing the name of the school, date,question checklist child name log, for audio recordings.

Children’s interview schedule con’t

Chldrens APpendix 4

Children’s interview schedule con’t

Teachers’ interview schedule

Name:

School

Teaching Experience:

Specialism:

Preamble

The study is an in depth exploration of “what features of the Starcatcher interface improve the quality of interaction”.

The interface means the computer screen.

Interaction means how the children are involved or are engaged by the interface.

The focus of the study is not the subject matter which is music, but the interface itself.

I would like to ask you about several key features about the design of the Starcatcher interface that the authors consider important. I am particularly interested in how the interface works in practice.

You are asked to just observe what some of the children are doing on the computer during the day making sure you are able to see the progam in total during that time (max 15 mins).

GENERAL QUESTIONS

  • Is there one comment about the software that strikes you right away as the most important to make?

  • How do you think the way the software works compares to other multimedia products in the school?

  • The authors believe the voice instructions are a very important part of the interface because children don’t have to read?

  • The authors believe it is important that the instructions are read out by children, because they provide peer group confidence?

  • The authors say children are more engaged in the learning process because children are using the mouse like at tool (beater) in this product.

The questions focus on the quality of:

a) The design and screen layout

b) The instructions

c) The actions using the mouse and the role they each play in fully involving children in completing the task.

The research also seeks to make a comparison between the different interfaces.

PARTICULAR QUESTIONS ABOUT EACH INTERFACE

Discussion whilst looking at the interface

THE OPENING SCREEN

1. What comment have you to make about the instructions?

2. To what extent does the artwork clearly indicate the task to be done by the children?

PROBE: The authors say this interface works because an open question encourages children to explore?

PROBE: What do you think would happen if children were told what to do?

3. What would you like to say about this screen and how it works in the classroom?

SUMMARY: Were there particular comments to note from your observations of what the children did?

ACTIVITY 1

  • What comment have you to make about the instructions?

  • To what extent does the artwork clearly indicate the task to be done by the children?

  • The authors believe this interface helps children to spell because children have to move the letters around rather than type them in?

  • To what extent do you think that moving the letters around helps or hinders children in achieving this task?

  • What comments have you to make about the way children were using the mouse?

SUMMARY: Were there particular comments to note from your observations of what the children did?

Teachers’ interview schedule con’t

ACTIVITY 2

  • What comment have you to make about the instructions?

  • To what extent does the artwork clearly indicate the task to be done by the children?

  • To what extent do you think that moving the objects helps children in achieving this task?

  • To what extent do you think that moving the objects hinders children in achieving this task?

  • What comments have you to make about the way children were using the mouse?

  • How does this taskdiffer from the previous task?

SUMMARY: Where there particular commentsto note from your observations of what the children did?

ACTIVITY 3 to ACTIVITY 6

  • What comment have you to make about the instructions?

  • To what extent does the artwork clearly indicate the task to be done by the children?

  • What comments have you to make about the way children were using the mouse?

  • PROMPT: To what extent do you think that moving the objects helps or hinders children in achieving this task?

  • How does this task differ from the previous task?

SUMMARY: Were there particular commentsto note from your observations of what the children did?

THE STORY

  • What comment have you to make about the instructions?

  • To what extent does the artwork clearly indicate the task to be done by the children?

  • The authors believe the story interface involves children more because they have to take themselves (click and drag) into the story?

  • The authors believe the story interface involves children more because of the looking down nature of the interface?

  • The authors believe the story interface involves children more because the interface allows them to look over the shoulder of the children in a story?

SUMMARY: Were there particular commentsto note from your observations of what the children did?

THE SONG

  • What comment have you to make about the instructions?

  • To what extent does the artwork clearly indicate the task to be done by the children?

  • The authors believe the interface will help children to learn the words and the tune of songs more quickly?

  • CLARIFY: What effect has the ability of the screen to highlight words as they are sung?

  • CLARIFY What effect has the ability of children to repeat the words and the tune?

  • How would you use this element of the package in the classroom?

  • How might it change the way you taught the tune and the song

SUMMARY

Were there particular commentsto note from your observations of what the children did?

TEACHER'S CONTROL SCREEN

Demonstration first:

  • Experts may say that because you, the teacher can switch sections on and off you are now in control of the software. Comment?

  • Would you find this screen easy to use yourself?

  • How would this screen help you organise classroom activities and learning?

  • The authors believe the control screen allows you to organise work for different ability levels in the class.

FINAL SUMMARY COMMENTS

  • What views do you have about this software?

  • Does the organisation of the software fit in with everyday classroom practice?

  • The authors say that because groups of three children are the most usual in a primary school the interface is ideal for group work.

  • Could you identify one aspect of the interface that works well?

  • Is there anything else you would like to add?

Appendix 2

British Journal of Educational Technology Paper, ‘Visual Elements and container metaphors for multi-media’ Copy of the original paper - attached pocket in PhD Thesis.

Appendix 3:

List of papers and presentations during the research period

Work in progress, Presentation, School of Cognitive and Computing

Sciences, University of Sussex, June, 2000.

Implications of current (PhD) research for course design and content. 5th Annual Research Conference, West Herts College, July, 2000.

VR: the Educational advantage, VR and Business lecture programme for DTITEC North Wales, November, 1999.

Demonstration of VRprojects software, The Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Laboratory (MPFSL), October, 1999.

Virtual Reality the commercial potential, Presentation, DTI VR Forum April, 1999.

Virtual Reality Photography: a new educational tool, paper, CAL 1999, Virtuality in Education. March, 1999.

Teaching Geography: Virtual Reality Photography for Geographers,.Vol 24, No:1 January, 1999.

Primary Geographer. The Virtual Reality School Trip.No: 33, April, 1998.

Aerial Virtual Reality Photography Paper, GISConference, Birkbeck College, May, 1998.

Virtually Helicopters, Article, Virtual Reality Helicopter Rotor Torque Autumn, 1998.

Virtual Photography for Geography, Presentation, Geographical Association Conference, April, 1998.

Visual elements and container metaphors in multimedia, British Journal of Educational Technology. Vol 28, No: 2 April, 1997.

Types of Learning with IT, Course, School of Education Licensed Teachers, June, 1997.

Work in progess, presentation, MENO (Multimedia and Narrative Organisation): Workshop for Designers,Institute of Educational Technology, Open University, November, 1997.

The Virtual University, presentation. Middlesex University School of Education Staff Awayday, January, 1997.

Don’t get lost navigating Multimedia: - use the container metaphor. paper, Mucort: Middlesex University Research Conference Dec, 1996.

What Makes Children Click?Paper Leicester University School of Education, October, 1996.

Strcatcher Project Update, presentation, BBC Radio Venture Centre. March, 1996

Research updatePaper, School of Education Middlesex University. January, 1996.

Starcatcher Interactive, BBC Education goes Interactive, accepted 'Euro Education 96' Denmark.

Work in progress, Paper Research Seminar Middlesex University School of Education March, 1995.

Work in progress, Presentation. Human Factors Dept. British Aerospace. Sowerby.

January, 1995.

What makes children click? Keynote speaker at International Conference of Media Communications, MediaCOM, 1995.

Mapping Childhood metaphors in 3-D, WCCE, paper World Conference in Computer Education, Birmingham, July, 1995.

Work in progress, Multimedia Association December, 1995.

The Electronic Hearth: Interactivity and the Human Interface Paper, MediaWavesOctober, 1995.

What Makes Children Click? Presentation, Computer-Mediated Learning Group Middlesex University, December, 1994.

Appendix 4:

Starcatcher Programme 1 of the Series (cassette tape and associated publications)

See separate attachment.

Appendix 5:

The CD-ROM of the research tool (Mac version)

Operating instructions

You should copy the whole folder RESEARCHTOOL onto you Hard Drive. The projector STARRY all other files should always be kept in the same folder.

1) Double click on STARRY

2) When the title screen appears hold down Alt + Apple keys

3) Click on top left star above 'Who is Starcatcher'

4) Choose Programme 1 (from the teacher's control panel)

5) Click Return to Main Menu

6) The Research Tool is now live. Rollover the figures to begin your exploration. If the mouse is not moved for a few second an audio file will play "Who is Starcather?"

7) Apple Q to exit

Other stars surrounding the 'Who is Starcatcher' title control other functions, but are for demonstration only. Use the Programme 1 option to switch on all facilities. You should have your sound functions on your Mac computer switched on to use the Research Tool (as all instructions are audio).

If you have problems please phone 0(44) 7778 537 505 or 0(44) 1992 597 292 Mike Howarth

Appendix 6: Field Work Diary Part 2:

PowerPoint Presentations

Reports For BBC Education Directorate

See in file Fieldworkdiary2.doc on accompanying CD-ROM

1 The NCET CD-ROMs in Primary Schools Initiative. Photographs and screen displays and analysis of classroom use of CD-ROMs during summer term 1994. "Schools needs." This material used by NCET Field Officers.

2 CD-ROMs in Secondary Schools . Photographs and reports signalling the growth in importance of CD-ROM in the school library, careers departments.

3 CD-ROM Task Cards. Evidence through working examples of National Curriculum applications of 10 well known Edutainment CD-ROMs(mainly from America).

4Pros and Cons of NCET Project CD-ROMs .An analysis of classroom use of CD-ROMs, emphasising the problems created by their design.

5 CD-ROM DESIGN A: Iconitis. A focused examination, with examples, of the problems children experience due to poorly designed icons.

6 CD-ROM DESIGN B: Symbols and Metaphors . What makes children tick/click? An M.Phil introductory paper, - interface design, preconscious, children's metaphors.

7 Operating Conditions in Primary Schools (photos)

8 What's wrong with Dorling Kindersley CD ROMs in the classroom. Screen design and effect on children's perception.

9 The Perfect CD-ROM - a brief list of requirements.

10 The making of the Secondary Progs. CD-ROM Catalogue. The production sequence, facilities at Interactive Media OUPC and tools required with implications for future products for the Education Directorate.

10A Summary of PhD research at 1/12/95 Mike Howarth Interactive Media Group Open University Production Centre.

REPORT CIRCULATION LIST

1.Jane Drabble Director of Education

2.Terry Marsh Head of Programmes, BBC Education

3.David Mortimer Head of Multimedia Publications

4.Clive Holloway Head of Programmes, OUPC

5.Liz Forgan Controller Radio 4

6.Heather Morris Director Educational Publications

7.Julie Cogill Chief Education Officer

8.Jay JohnstonChief Assistant, Education Programmes

9.Roger Fry Resource Manager

10.Sara Hemmings Head of Developments, BBC Enterprises

11.Geof Marshall-Taylor Executive Producer Education Radio

12.Jane Shaw Chief Education Officer Continuing Education.

13.Mathew Lee Strategy Planner

14.Lucia Jones Head Education Policy and Services